Headpoint Consulting Logo Design Critique 3

Jul 07, 2009 / Erik Peterson
Headpoint Consulting Logo Design Critique Logo

Headpoint Consulting Logo Design Critique

Jon submitted this logo for Headpoint Consulting. He left the following comment about the logo,

“A new executive coaching consultancy firm... looking to portray an image of competence but remain interesting and dynamic”

The following critique is based on one designer’s opinion and experience. I always appreciate the readers thoughts as well. So, I’ll ask a question of two in the critique, please share your perspective in the comments at the end of this logo design critique.

Design Principals

The logo for Headpoint Consulting has an intriguing start, but lacks cohesion and balance. The logo feels like two different parts. The head shaped oval with the ‘T’ inside doesn’t feel like it belongs with the rest of the mark. There are two main factors contributing to this disjointed appearance. First, the abstracted ‘T’ created by the white space within the oval shape doesn’t fit with the rest of the typography (i.e., weight, color, shape, rotation, etc.). Second, focusing all of the color on the right side within the oval shape also contributes to the disconnection.

Question for the readers

please respond in the comments below

Does this logo feel like two separate parts to you? What can be done to remedy this situation?

Functionality / Versatility

This logo should reproduce in most mediums well. The use of flat colors and simple shapes is good for reproduction. The lightweight typeface for ‘Consulting’ may become problematic (or may need to be made heavier) when used in embroidery or reduced to a small size and silk screened like you might find on a pen. There was a good article over at The Design Cubicle about how a good logo needs to be flexible. You may want to take quick read.

Does the Logo Work for the Audience?

I think one way of portraying competence is to have a professional looking logo. It shows you care and are serious about your business. If your business is truly focused solely on executive coaching I’m not sure that you’re hitting the mark there. To me, the mark feels more pedestrian and complacent instead of presenting concepts of leadership, drive, etc. Again, if executive coaching is your focus shouldn’t the company name reflect that also? Perhaps “Headpoint Executive Coaching” is a more telling business name.

Question for the readers

please respond in the comments below

How would you portray these concepts visually? Or do you think the mark is already accomplishing the messages needed?

Typography

I know Jon isn’t a designer, however I’m not sure if he designed this logo himself or if he hired someone to do it. At any rate, the kerning needs tweaking. For example, the space around the ‘A’ has a larger visual gap on the right side and should be adjusted. The letter spacing of ‘consulting’ is too open when used next to the tight letter spacing in ‘Headpoint’. Perhaps you could tighten it up and align it to the left or right of the word above. This would also create some variety in the mark which now feels so structured (at least in the type on the left). Overall, I think the type needs attention. It comes across quite sterile and uninspiring.

The abstractness of the letter ‘T’ within the oval shape not only creates the disjointed feeling I discussed earlier, it also creates a situation where the viewer will likely read the company name as ‘Headpoin Consulting’ the first time around. The combination of the rotation, negative space, color change and abstractness is just too much.

Possible Improvements

Designing a logo for yourself or own business is one of the hardest logo designs you’ll ever work on. So what is the best way to improve the logo? Well I think have made some comments above that can certainly offer some direction. Here’s a list of actionable items.

  1. Explore ways to communicate the concept of ‘executive coaching’ in a more digestible way.
  2. Consider some alternatives for the oval shape with the ‘T’ in it. Perhaps finding a way to make the ‘T’ the same color as the rest of the word it belongs to would be a step in the right direction for creating unity and legibility.
  3. Review the letter spacing of the word consulting.
  4. Utilize color to help achieve balance and unity within the mark.

Overall, I think you have a good start on the logo design. And with some refinement you can definitely improve it. Please know that my intention in critiquing your work is not to hurt feelings, but to offer constructive feedback. I hope it was helpful. Best of luck, to you!

I appreciate and welcome your comments, and look forward to hearing from you soon. I purposely don’t cover every possible improvement that can be made to this logo, so go for it if you think I missed anything. All I ask is that you keep your comments clean and appropriate.

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3 Comments so far. Keep 'em Coming.

#1

By Bullardino

07.07.2009 at 02:58 PM

Bullardino Profile Image

First problem, in my opinion, is the “balloon” thing. It’s directed outwards (leans on the right), and it separates things.

#2

By Marlou

07.08.2009 at 11:34 AM

Marlou Profile Image

I really like the idea and concept of this logo; very clever!
Though, I do think it still -looks- like a concept. The logo indeed looks like it consists of two different parts. I think the logo would look much more as one logo, if the image of the head had the same colors as the text. Or, as Erik suggested, if the whitespace in the head had the same color as the text.
Be sure to make the whitespace T look like it’s part of the rest of the text. You don’t want people to read it as “Headpoin”. Did you try other fonts? Maybe the T will be more visible if it’s taken from a font.
Good luck, I think you’ve got a great start here.

#3

By Fbanczak

07.09.2009 at 02:11 PM

Fbanczak Profile Image

Jon, I think your logo is clean, modern, and overall pleasing. But when I look beyond a glance at it, what bothers my eye the most is that the colors in the balloon head icon don’t have the same value or visual weight to appear cohesive. I almost feel like the T should either be these same gray or the T should be white (negative space) and the three parts of the head should be the same gray (maybe you’ll be able to introduce one new accent color). Either way, to make the icon part of the logo, the colors probably need to be darker to match the weight of the text and perhaps the color of “Consulting” should be changed to match one of the head balloon colors.

On a side note, I did see what I think was intended by the creator of the logo as an abstracted sketch of a face. Where the top of the T represents the highlight of the check bones and the vertical line is the line from the nose to the chin. If that is the concept with the head-balloon, maybe some more shaping could help others see what I saw.


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